Grading Rubric Deliverables

Grading Rubric Deliverables

This blog post contains animated GIFs and descriptions of each grading rubric element to demonstrate the final Address Infinite project met all expectations.

If you wish to read a self-assessment of my project with my final score included please click here and download the self-assesment PDF file. There is also a video on that page which contains a single walkthrough of the application with indicators pointing out the grading rubric moments, the animated GIFs on this post were taken from that video (albeit the video is slower as the animated GIFs have less frames to help reduce load time wait for this page).

Note: This page may take a minute to load the GIF animations. Each of the screenshots with the application screen should contain an animation that loops.

Grading Rubric: Performance

The performance portion of the grading rubric for Address Infinite is broken down into two parts. The first part is the load time of the application, or how quickly does the application take to load the login screen, and the second part is the syncing time, or how quickly does the application sync with the online blockchain.

In the animated GIF you can see the application loading and then a download progress bar filling to 100% which is the blockchain syncing. Normally a blockchain syncing would take a little while but as the application is brand new, the syncing is near instant.

The grading rubric specifies that in order for the load time to be excellent it would have to load in under 10 seconds. My testing measured the load time to take between 1-3 seconds on average.

The grading rubric specifies that in order for the syncing to be excellent it would have to complete syncing in under 30 seconds. My testing had the syncing complete within 3-5 seconds of the application loading.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Login & Registration: Registration

The functionality portion of the grading rubric for Address Infinite is broken down into four parts, each with three or less sub-parts. The first part of the functionality portion is Login & Regsitration. The GIF above depicts successfully registering a new account.

The grading rubric specifies that a successful registration is worth 15 points. As demonstrated above, I was able to successfully register without a problem during my testing.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Login & Registration: Login

The GIF above depicts successfully logging into an account using a pass key file. It is also possible to login just by typing in or cutting and pasting an account id and secret key.

The grading rubric specifies that a successful login is worth 8 points. As demonstrated above, I was able to successfully login without a problem during my testing.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Login & Registration: Transition

The GIF above (used for the login as well) depicts the successfull transition from the login screen to the application. This transition occurs when an account is successfully created or logged in. The transtion will expand the application window to a larger size and then load the left navigation, toolbars, and default to the contact management tool.

The grading rubric specifies that a successful transition is worth 7 points. As demonstrated above, I was able to successfully transition without a problem during my testing, this applies to both creating an account and logging in with an existing account.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Contact Management: View Contact

The GIF above demonstrates successfully clicking on a contact to see the view screen for that contact.

The grading rubric specifies that being able to select a contact and view the contact data without issue is worth 10 points. During my testing I was able to perform this task without incident.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Contact Management: Add, Edit and Delete Contact

The GIF above demonstrates successfully adding, editing and deleting a contact.

The grading rubric specifies that being able to add, edit and delete a contact without issue is worth 20 points. During my testing I was able to perform this task without incident.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Schedule Manager: View Event

The GIF above demonstrates successfully double clicking on an event to view event details. The schedule calendar is different than other areas in that the view, create and edit screens happen in the same way, by double clicking in a calendar, either in an empty space to create an event, or on an existing event to view/edit an event. You can also view the different aspects of the calendar mode to see the events organized in different ways.

The grading rubric specifies that being able to view an event in the calendar and the associated event data without issue is worth 10 points. During my testing I was able to perform this task without incident.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Schedule Manager: Add, Edit and Delete an Event

The GIF above (same as the view event) demonstrates successfully double clicking on an event to add the event, doing the same to edit the event and then opening the event and selecting delete to delete the event.

The grading rubric specifies that being able to perform these tasks without issue is worth 20 points. During my testing I was able to perform these tasks without incident.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Notes: View Notes

The GIF above demonstrates that notes can successfully be viewed in the main notes area.

The grading rubric specifies that being able to view notes without issue is worth 10 points. During my testing I was able to perform this task without incident.

Grading Rubric: Functionality: Notes: Add, Edit and Delete a Note

The GIF above (same as the view notes) demonstrates successfully adding, editing and deleting a note.

The grading rubric specifies that being able to perform these tasks without issue is worth 20 points. During my testing I was able to perform these tasks without incident.

Grading Rubric: Design: Affordances

The GIFs above provide some examples of how the design is structured in such a way as to be self-evident on how to navigate and use the application. The buttons are clearly labeled. and the editable fields are clearly visible and understandable thanks to the use of web technologies within the application which utilize standard browser-like input fields.

The grading rubric specifies that self-evident interfaces and clearly marked editable versus readable fields are worth 10 points if excellent. During my testing I believe the application met these requirements.

Grading Rubric: Design: Legibility

The GIFs above provide some examples of how the design was very legible. The application used a sans-serif font (Monospace) starting at 14 pixel size in order to maintain legibility. The buttons were large and easy to access and common user interface standards were used. The line height of the text was set to 1.5 em and the color scheme of the application provided a comfortable level of contrast between the content and design elements. 

The grading rubric specifies that an excellent legible design is worth 10 points. During my testing I believe the application met these requirements.

Grading Rubric: Code: Readability

The GIF above demonstrates that the code was well-organized, commented and divided up into logical functions and classes. If you would like to see the code sample in action please view the final project page and download the application zip. Included in the zip is a "Code" directory with both the library in the GIF above and an example of what the encryption process looks like before and after.

The grading rubric specifies that meeting all of the requirements is worth 10 points. I believe the code for this application meets these requirements.

Grading Rubric: Code: Consistency

The GIF above (same as readability) demonstrates that the code indented properly and uses a consistent camel-case based naming schema. Four spaced soft tabs were used for indentation of the code. Above I have included a screenshot of the directory structure of the source code to show that the directory structure was well-organized.

The grading rubric specifies that meeting all of the requirements is worth 10 points. I believe the consistency of the code for this application meets these requirements.

Extras

After the grading rubric was finalized I added some extra features to the application. These additional features include a real-time contacts search, a pass key system for logging in, the ability to exit the application and remember your login, and finally a simply to use yet complex plugin system that allows plugin installation in order to expand Address Infinite indefinitely.

The GIF above depicts the successful installation, demonstration and removal of a Weather plugin I created for Address Infinite. Once installed, the plugin will pull an external feed from a third-party source, showing the weather forecast of a contact's location on their view screen, if the contact has their city and state fields populated.

In Conclusion

I believe Address Infinite has met all of the requirements specified in the grading rubric under the excellent column. Although simple at first glance, I think Address Infinite is surprising complex when you look under the hood and realize the possibilities due to peer-to-peer networking and plugin expansion. It is a good foundation for a fun and usable address book application that takes privacy and cross-platform compatibility very seriously.

I very much enjoyed the Capstone Project course and wish everyone the best of luck! Thank You!

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